Category Archives: Photography

Honor 10 Camera & Editing App Tutorials + 90 Photos Camera Showcase #Honor10 #BeautyInAI

Welcome to my tutorial video, showing how to use the Honor 10 Camera app and all its modes. The video features a number of tips and tricks. Then I take a look at the Honor photo editing app, which is part of the Gallery app.

Then as requested, I have included a camera showcase with over 90 photos that I have snapped with the Honor 10. All of these photos are in Auto with AI left on!

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Views from the summit of Staple Tor – One of the highest points on Dartmoor National Park – Shot on the Huawei P20 Pro

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Walking uphill to Staple Tor, the weather didn’t look too clever. Unfortunately, my 4 labradors, George, Fury, Tiggy and Sophie don’t quite understand or care if it rains 🙂

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

At the start of the walk, it was a mixture of strong winds, the odd blast of sun and spits of rain. In fact hail stones had fallen 5 minutes before the start of the walk.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

From a distance, Staple Tor is difficult to distinguish all its features. There are three parts to Staple Tors – Little, Mid and Great. Great Staple Tor is famous for its towers of granite blocks that perch on each other creating unusual shapes. Little Staple Tor has an extensive clitter field. The Staple Tors together with Roos Tor form a chain of tors that stand proud on the west side of the Walkham valley.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

From the summit you have stunning views across Dartmoor National Park.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

In the distance, you can see North Hessary mast.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Staple Tor is one of the largest Tors on Dartmoor as well as one of the highest. These naturally formed granite stones are incredible to see.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

My 4 dogs love the granite rocks, exploring and jumping over and around them.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

The views are stunning from Staple Tor, but you do have to watch out for flying red flags, as you can see in the distance. This means the army is practising manoeuvres using live ammunition. Therefore, you are not allowed to pass beyond this point.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

There is a published timetable of when the army will be carrying out its activities, so it is possible to walk beyond and into the danger zone.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

After walking downhill, its time to cool off. Well for my 4 dogs.

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Views from the summit of Staple Tors #dartmoor #huaweip20pro

Staple Tor is definitely one place worth a visit if you are travelling to Dartmoor National Park. Photos shot using a Huawei P20 Pro smartphone.

Exeter Guildhall – The Medieval Grade 1 Building – Shot on the Huawei P20 Pro

Exeter Guildhall #exeter #huaweip20pro

Exeter Guildhall is located in the High Street, Exeter, Devon, England. It has been the centre of civic government for the City of Exeter for at least 600 years. Much of the fabric of the building is medieval, though the elaborate frontage was added in the 1590s and the interior was extensively restored in the 19th century. It is now a Grade I listed building and is still used for a range of civic functions.

The building appears to have been on its current site since the 12th Century and therefore it has been claimed to be the oldest municipal building in England still in use.

Exeter Guildhall #exeter #huaweip20pro

The elaborately carved oak door, dated 1593, was made by Nicholas Baggett, a local carpenter. It leads via an anteroom to the council chamber which apparently dates to 1468-70, though it was much restored in Victorian times. The arch-braced roof with seven bays is original; its main trusses rest on carved corbels representing grotesque animals.

A large chandelier hangs from the centre of the roof. It was made by Thomas Pyke of Bridgwater and installed in 1789. Apart from this and the roof, all the internal fittings are Victorian, including the stained glass, the gallery, the furniture and the stone floor, all 1863, and the heavily restored Tudor panelling (year 1887). Above the fireplace is a bust of Queen Victoria by Henry Hugh Armstead.

Exeter Guildhall #exeter #huaweip20pro

Under the council chamber there is an early 14th-century cellar. This was once a prison that was known as the “pytt of the Guyldhall”. In the 16th century another prison, for women, was built on the ground floor at the back of the building. It remained in use until 1887. In 1858 a room was built above this to store the city’s records; it was later used as a jury room.

Exeter Guildhall has been a Grade I listed building since 1953 and is also a scheduled ancient monument. Exeter City Council still use the Guildhall for civil purposes such as official receptions, mayoral banquets, some City Council meetings, other meetings and exhibitions and occasionally as a magistrates’ court.

Inside Exeter Cathedral – The Architectural Gothic Masterclass – Shot on the Huawei P20 Pro

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Exeter Cathedral was founded in 1050, and the construction of a Cathedral on the present site began in 1114.

The two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls of this Norman (Romanesque) building survive in the present Cathedral. A major rebuild, in Decorated Gothic style, was carried out under six bishops between c.1270 and c.1350.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

The magnificent Bishop’s Throne is one of the greatest treasures of medieval woodwork in Europe. It was made in the early 14th century using local Devon oak and is 18m (59ft) tall.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

The 14th century stone vault which forms the nave and quire ceiling is one of the glories of Exeter Cathedral. It is the longest continuous medieval stone vault in the world. As there is no central tower, the vault can run all the way from the west wall of the nave to the Great East Window at the far end of the quire, a distance of approximately 96m (315ft).

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Either side of the Cathedral, about half way along the north and south sides, there are two square towers. They were built between 1114 and 1133 as part of the Norman cathedral.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

The West Front Image Screen of Exeter Cathedral is one of the great architectural features of Medieval England. The addition of the image screen around 1340 marked the completion the re‑building of the cathedral in the Gothic style. Work continued on the screen with the additional top tier completed about 1470.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

An extensive project to repair and reset lead crestings along the Cathedral roof was completed in 2014. The leadwork, comprising over 400 single pieces, each in the shape of a fleur de lys, is a unique feature of the Cathedral’s roof. Over the centuries some of it had slipped and there was a significant risk of lead falling from the roof. Work was carried out to remove and examine each piece, and cost £70,000. Part of the project was funded by the First World War Centenary Cathedral Repairs Fund.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

In 2016 a specialist survey (carried out every five years) examined the state of any remaining colouring (the original polychrome) as well as investigating the condition of the carved statues.
This survey informed a phased programme of works around the following areas:

Non-invasive cleaning of the polychrome areas. Repairs to the statues with lime mortar to prevent water from pooling around the stonework and, where possible, halt further decay. The cotton wool used around these repair sites prevents the mortar from drying out too quickly and failing.
Application of a sheltercoat to protect the image screen from the weather. The work was carried out by the Cathedral’s own stonemasons, supported by The Prince of Wales who made a donation through The Prince of Wales’ Charitable Foundation.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

The Cathedral stonemasons have commenced the repair and conservation of the stonework and glazing to three bays of the South Quire ‘Clerestory’. This work will be completed during 2018.

Exeter Cathedral - inside the Cathedral #huaweip20pro

Exeter Cathedral is one of the great Cathedrals of England, and one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture anywhere. It is well worth a visit.

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Source of info Exeter Cathedral website.

A Tour of Bristol’s architectural highlights – Shot on the Huawei P20 Pro in black & white

Bristol is full of architectural delights. From the Grand Hotel above in Broad Street to some spectacular buildings in Corn Street.

But it’s not just Corn or Broad Street that holds some architectural gems. Walking around the City centre reveals more great places.

A short walk down to the canal reveals even more buildings.

All these photos were shot on the Huawei P20 Pro using its dedicated monochrome mode.

The above are just a snapshot into the architecture of Bristol city centre.

Landhydrock House – One of National Trust’s Best Houses – Shot on the Huawei P20 Pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

The Landhyrock House stands in 890 acres above the River Fowey in Cornwall near Bodmin. It has been owned and managed by the National Trust since 1953.Much of the present house dates back to Victorian times but some sections date from the 1620s. It is a Grade I listed building and is set in gardens with formal areas. The hill behind the house is planted with a fine selection of shrubs and trees.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Lanhydrock estate belonged to the Augustinian priory of St Petroc at Bodmin but the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the 1530s saw it pass into private hands. In 1620 wealthy merchant Sir Richard Robartes, of Truro, acquired the estate and began building Lanhydrock House, designed to a four-sided layout around a central courtyard and constructed of grey granite.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Robartes died in 1624 but work on the building was continued by his son John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor, a notable public figure who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. The embattled walls were built of rough, massive granite blocks with years 1636 and 1642 on the walls, indicating when they were built.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

A barbican gate was added and the house was garrisoned by Parliamentary forces in August 1644 when Sir Richard Grenville took possession.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

During the 18th century the east wing of the house was demolished leaving the U-shaped plan seen today.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

The public tour is one of the longest of any National Trust house and takes in the service rooms, nurseries and some servants’ bedrooms, as well as the main reception rooms and family bedrooms. In 2004 it was one of the Trust’s ten most visited paid-entry properties, with over 200,000 visitors.

Fangs #HuaweiP20Pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

All the above photos were shot on the Huawei P20 Pro. Below some monochrome mode shots of the exterior.

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

Landhydrock House #nationaltrust #huaweip20pro

The interior shots were shot using the night mode as light was fairly dim inside most of the rooms. The lack of light is used to protect paintings and other old items that can deteriorate under bright lighting. The night mode is a hand held mode (no tripod needed or used) that shoots up to 6 seconds. For all of the above shots, the P20 Pro choose a 4 second shutter.

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Info Source – Wikipedia

Huawei P20 Pro – Shooting at Night with the Camera – It’s a BEAST – Auto vs Night vs Pro mode all compared

The task was simple. Take the new Huawei P20 Pro and see how its 3 rear camera setup performed at night The Huawei P20 Pro is able to take 4-5 second hand held long exposure shots without using a tripod.

So how did it do? Well the shots below were taken in time order just before it went completely dark outside.

The shot above is taken in auto, hand held. The exif data shows is ISO 1,250 and the shutter speed of 0.06 seconds.

However, with a quick flip up to night mode in the Huawei P20 Pro camera app, and the above is a 4 second hand held shot. No tripod and a 4 second long exposure. Super impressive stuff. The ISO is 1,000 with a 4 second shutter speed. Look how much less noise there is in this shot.

But if you happen to have a tripod, the manual modes can perform wonders. This is using night mode again, but with a 8 second shutter speed. The ISO was forced down to ISO 100.

A bit of fun above. Using the light painting mode to capture some car light trails. It is now getting close to total darkness, except for the street lamps. The above shot was a 12.6 seconds exposure with an ISO 64. A tripod was used.

Now while I was using the tripod, I used the dedicated monochrome mode to shoot the above. A 8 second exposure. ISO 50.

I cannot stress enough how pitch black it was inside the church. The above shot is auto mode. The ISO is 12,800 with a 0.06 second exposure. That’s right the ISO went as high as 12,800 in this shot. With a upcoming software update, the P20 Pro will be able to shoot with an ISO as high as 102,000.

But as mentioned above, the Huawei P20 Pro has a special night mode. Now it performed a 5 second hand held long exposure. ISO 3,200. Look at how superb the shot is!

And finally, the shot above was taking in Pro mode, ISO 100 with a 8 second exposure.

Some very impressive shots from the Huawei P20 Pro at night/pitch black.

Soussons Forest, Dartmoor National Park – Shot on the Samsung S9+

Yesterday I visited Soussons Forest in Dartmoor National Park and took some photos with my Galaxy S9+. The above shot in the forest is of 3 of my labradors running along the path. Tiggy is out front with Sophie and George holding up the rear.

Photographing trees allows for some superb tree symmetry.

My 4 labradors loved running along the path. Also it was the first day in ages where it wasn’t snowing.

First shot shows Fury in the lead. And the next shot is of George and Sophie running together.

Stunning views.

The forest colours are fantastic to capture.

The above shot used the 2 times zoom of the S9+. Without the optical zoom the shot would be rubbish. In the distance you can see Bellever Tor.

Catching the sun for that special shot.

And finally, logging occurs in the forest.

Dartmoor National Park – The Snow Roads several days later

2 lanes become 1 because of the snow

The main roads in the South West of England may have all been cleared of snow, but up on Dartmoor National Park, that’s not the case.

Snow landscape on Dartmoor

There is still plenty of snow across the landscape, but due to the blizzard conditions and drifts when it fell from Saturday through to Monday morning, the snow ended up being up to 10ft deep in many places on Dartmoor.

Several days later still snow on the roads on Dartmoor

Even after gritting and ploughing, there is just too much snow in places. Many lanes haven’t been ploughed yet either and are literally filled up as high as car roofs.

Snow Roads on Dartmoor

Is winter over? Nope. The forecast is for more snow next week over Easter. All the above photos were shot on the Samsung Galaxy S9+.

Snow Storm hits Princetown on Dartmoor National Park – Photos from the Samsung Galaxy S9+ featuring Snow Dogs

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

The snow started falling Saturday 17th March 2018, it briefly stopped for 4 hours on Sunday 18th March between 6am and 10.30am, and then it returned at full pelt until 3am on Monday 19th March 2018. Below are photos taken on the 18th March 2018. All the footage is shot on the Samsung Galaxy S9+.

Plus a short video.

The top photo and the one below are of the road leading out of the village. About 300 yards further down, the road was totally blocked with a huge snow drift lasting about 100 yards.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

The above shot is at the entrance to Princetown.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

You can just about see the Tors in the distance. This was using the 2 x optical zoom of the S9+. The wind was still very strong.

Heres a tweet showing the road further down, that even caused 4 x 4’s to get stuck, including a Police Land Rover. The local police spent 90 mins digging themselves out.

Heres a short video of the conditions https://www.pscp.tv/w/1OyKANbOmWWGb

Part of the main road in Princetown.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Above, its not snowing anymore, but the wind is blowing strongly.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

The snow is deep, in many places with 10ft plus snow drifts. Below Fury, Sophie and Tiggy enjoying the snow.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Nothing stops George from having a run.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Above. Hard to tell the 2 girls apart, but Fury is looking down at Sophie.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Above, Tiggy and Sophie.

Snowmageddon on Dartmoor

Above, George and Sophie.

And has winter left for good? More snow is forecasted over Easter!

Samsung Galaxy S9+ – Camera samples comparing the 2 aperture modes of f/1.5 and f/2.4

So the Samsung Galaxy S9+ and S9 camera is the first to have 2 aperture settings. Either a f/1.5 or f/2.4. In auto mode it decides which aperture to use, but switching to Pro mode and you can choose yourself.

So lets take a look at some examples. I have uploaded the full size versions in this post, so click each photo for more options.

Both the photo above and below were shot in f/1.5. This was inside a church which had no lights on. See other shots further down. Going in close at f/1.5 allows for some great natural bokeh. No need for fake portrait modes, even though the S9 camera does have one!

The level of detail in the shot above is excellent. Blown up on a big screen, the photo looks superb.

Above is using the f/2.4 aperture. A much darker shot and some of the detail has been lost. However, a longer shutter speed of 1/4 second would compensate a little. The S9’s OIS is able to hold the image still for a 1/4 second with ease.

Above is f/1.5 on the fake flower. You can create a great bokeh in this setting.

But shooting at f/2.4 as above, creates a sharper crispier image. It’s handy to have the choice to decide.

Above is shot at f/2.4 and is an actual indication of the true light levels inside the church. This is what all the photos in this post had available for natural light.

Now moving to f/1.5 and what a difference.

So there you have it. Photos of the same scene shot in the different aperture options, allowing some creative control. Or just shoot in auto, and let the S9+ make the call.

Ancient Mystic Trees of Dartmoor National Park – Shot on an iPhone X

Wandering around Dartmoor National Park reveals many glorious sites and depending on the time of day, can completely alter the colours of the landscape.

The trees often have a mystic quality about them. Below are a few photos from the iPhone X. Enjoy.

I really like the natural colours of the trees and growth at ground level.

Switching to HDR black and white created a whole new look.

Sometimes it is just nice to take a pano of the scene.

Even the bridges are pretty old now.

And if you visit Dartmoor National Park, keep a look out for the local security guards 🙂

Shot and Edited on an Apple iPhone X – Snow Drifts & Blizzards – The Beast from the East

My village on Dartmoor National Park was late receiving the snow. It first arrived on 1st March and continued on the 2nd. Last night late into the night, more snow fell. In terms of temperatures, we average minus 15 degrees centigrade at night for a week. (wind chill temp).

However, this morning, its all thawing out. Before we get to the video, here are some photos of my village, Princetown.

The below video was filmed using the default camera app on the iPhone X, then edited using iMovie and Luma Fusion apps on the iPhone.

Enjoy.